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Using a PEO for Payroll to Help With Your Expanding Business

Your business is expanding, and although you may be excited to see your company thrive and be successful, you’re probably wondering how you are going to take on all of the extra responsibilities that come with the growth of your business.

Payroll administration is an integral part of running a company and must be kept up to date at all times to avoid any accounting or salary concerns. There are many federal, state, and local laws you have to comply with concerning employees. As a small business owner, you may not have had any issues with staying on top of your human resource obligations. However, as you gain more employees, having to complete payroll duties can become overwhelming and time-consuming; which is where a PEO can help!

A PEO can perform many payroll and HR functions for your business. Sharing responsibility for your employees through a co-employment system allows you to manage your staff while running your company, and lets the PEO take care of things such as wages, taxes, and benefits.

Outsourcing Helps You Achieve Your Goals

Using a PEO helps you achieve your goals by freeing up time and resources so you can concentrate on your core business. You reduce the risk of not processing your payroll by allowing an experienced organization to assist in making sure your employees always get paid.

After you tell your PEO how many hours each employee has worked, the PEO will calculate the employee’s paychecks and tax responsibilities. The employees will then be paid by checks or direct deposit. When it’s time for taxes and deposits to be filed, the PEO can also help you take care of that as well.

Although a PEO helps you with your payroll administration, you are still responsible for sending in all required paperwork on time, such as new employee information, time cards, or updates regarding an employee’s life event. If your staff doesn’t get paid on time because you delayed getting your PEO the proper information, the PEO will not be held responsible.

The Right PEO Can Give You Peace of Mind

It’s important to work with a PEO who is reputable and will work honestly on your behalf. You are giving your payroll provider access to the names, addresses, social security numbers, and bank account information of the employees who work for you as well as allowing the PEO to file on your behalf.

Our company takes pride in helping you alleviate the stress that comes with handling employee payrolls each week. Whether you have a small or large business, Professional Employer Resources, Inc. (PER) is happy to assist you with your payroll administration needs. Leaving the payroll duties to us allows you to run your business with peace of mind. For questions relating to payroll administration or any of the services we provide, call 888.599.4991.

PER Human Resources – November 2017

November 2017
Want to know the latest buzz in the HR arena?  Professional Employer Resources has a world of information in our newsletter. Not only is it fun it’s resourceful! Including, important changes to federal and state employment practices.

Eighty five percent (85%) of all employment lawsuits can be prevented!

Monday Misery:
Weekend Drama in Your In-Box
HR Stories From The Front Lines*

 

You probably dread Monday mornings. Not just because it’s the start of another long week, but because Mondays are often unpredictable. The following nightmare of imbibing employees could give reality TV a run for its money. Let’s listen in to their inebriated misadventures to see what can be learned in this edition of
HR Stories From the Front Lines.*

Read more
(*These incidents really happened; but names and other details have been changed.)

 

Stay Up to Date on the Latest Employment Legal Updates

FEDERAL UPDATES
2017’s Top 10 OSHA Citations Have Been Released
New Case: Federal Court Finds Pregnancy Discrimination Act Protects Breastfeeding
Trick or Treat! DOL Treats Employers with the Promise of a New Overtime Rule

STATE UPDATES
ALL STATES: 2018 Minimum Wage Check-Up
Alabama: NEW LAW – Birmingham City Council Passes Nondiscrimination Ordinance
Alaska: NEW LAW – Minimum Wage to Increase January 1, 2018
California: NEW LAW – California Has Officially “Banned the Box”
California: NEW LAW – California Passes Parental Leave for Small Employers
California: NEW LAW – California Passes Salary History Ban
California: NEW LAW – Favors Employees In Wage Retaliation And Whistleblower Claims
California: NEW LAW – New Requirements for California Sexual Harassment Training
California: NEW LAW – California “Immigrant Worker Protection Act”
California: NEW LAW – New Requirements for Sexual Harassment Training For Farm Labor Contractors In California
California: NEW LAW – California Expands Human Trafficking Posting Requirements
Florida: NEW LAW – Minimum Wage to Increase January 1, 2018
Illinois: NEW LAW – Online Employee Misclassification Complaint System
New York: NEW FORMS – Paid Family Leave Model Forms Now Available
Ohio: NEW LAW – Minimum Wage to Increase January 1, 2018
Rhode Island: NEW LAW – Rhode Island Enacts Paid Sick Leave
South Dakota: NEW LAW – Minimum Wage to Increase January 1, 2018


Do you have an HR question keeping you up at night?
The following questions were submitted to our HR Professionals in the past month …

Question #1
Our company has few field employees, District Managers who oversee multiple stores and Maintenance Employees who perform scheduled and unscheduled maintenances of all our restaurants.
We pay a mileage reimbursement to those who drive their personal vehicles based on the actual number of business miles they drive. We also pay a set amount to those who use their personal phones for business purpose.

So far, we have been using a hand-written mileage sheet for mileage reimbursement but recently we have decided to test a work force management mobile application for tracking mileage to be more efficient.
This application requires access to employee phone’s GPS while they are on the clock. We don’t want the GPS tracking to raise some privacy complaints down the road,
so we are trying to get things clarified in a signed agreement. We have no interest in their whereabouts when they are not on the clock, the application can be turned on and off.

Please let us know your thoughts and if you have a sample agreement that we can use that would be wonderful.

Question #2
I have an employee who needs to go out on leave to take care of his mother who has
Alzheimer’s and cannot be left alone. He is trying to find someone to stay with her. He has not
been here a year yet, so he is not eligible for family leave. Do I need to give him the usual
forms and note that he is not eligible for FMLA? Is there anything else I need to do?

View the Answers

What Does At-Will Employment Mean?

 

Brain Teaser

Mark started working at A2Z Appliances seven weeks ago. In that time, he has been absent at least 10 times, rude to customers and coworkers, and refusing to perform certain job duties. Management is starting to believe that Mark is not a good fit for the position and business.
His team members do not like his attitude and believe he is taking advantage of the company.

The company offers a probationary period to the employees. Since most states, except Montana, allow for employment “at will”, management feels it can terminate the employment relationship for the reasons mentioned above.

However, Mark’s supervisor has never addressed the numerous issues with Mark. Today, Mark was over thirty minutes late to work. Mark’s supervisor can no longer take it and wants Mark gone.

How should Mark’s future with the company be addressed?

  1. Terminate the relationship because the company is an “at-will” employer.
  2. Mark can be terminated because he is on his probationary period.
  3. Speak to Mark about his excessive absences and determine if he requires reasonable accomodations.

View the answer.

 

Workplace Violence – Is Your Company Prepared?
HR Trends

In the aftermath of last month’s Las Vegas shooting, employers nationwide have been on high alert regarding workplace violence and asking one simple question — Do our managers know how to handle workplace violence?

Read ahead for five simple, yet effective, guidelines to help your managers deal with this dangerous and difficult situation.


This information is provided by ePlace Solutions, Inc. which is solely responsible for its content. ePlace Solutions, Inc. is not engaged in rendering legal or other professional services. Federal and state laws are more complex than presented here. This information is simplified for the sake of brevity and is not a substitute for legal advice. ePlace Solutions, Inc. disclaims any liability, loss or risk incurred as a consequence, directly or indirectly, of the use and application of any of the contents of this information.

PER Human Resources – October 2017

October 2017
Want to know the latest buzz in the HR arena?  Professional Employer Resources has a world of information in our newsletter. Not only is it fun it’s resourceful! Including, important changes to federal and state employment practices.

Eighty five percent (85%) of all employment lawsuits can be prevented!

Worse than a Soap Opera: How to Handle a Workplace Love Triangle
HR Stories From The Front Lines*

As an HR Professional, you’ve probably encountered your fair share of awkward situations. But what if you learned about a workplace relationship that involved not one but two subordinates and a manager?
Avoiding potential sexual harassment claims means handling sticky situations with extreme caution. Let’s see what we can learn from one HR Professional’s love triangle nightmare. *

Let’s join “Workplace Love Triangle” on HR Stories from the Frontlines.

Read more

(*These incidents really happened; but names and other details have been changed.)

 

Stay Up to Date on the Latest Employment Legal Updates

FEDERAL UPDATES
REMINDER — Engaging In The Interactive Process Is An Ongoing Duty
REMINDER – Pay Attention To Local Minimum Wage Laws
NEW POSTER – New E-Verify Poster Published
Federal Contractor Minimum Wage to Increase In 2018
New Form I-9 Now In Effect

STATE UPDATES
Connecticut: NEW CASE: Fluctuating Workweek Prohibited for Certain Connecticut Employees
Connecticut: NEW LAWS – Three New Laws Going Into Effect on October 1, 2017
Florida: Wage And Hour Laws To Keep In Mind In The Aftermath Of Hurricane Irma
Michigan: IMPORTANT REMINDER for Michigan Employers Regarding Reasonable Accommodation
Minnesota: NEW LAW – Minnesota’s Minimum Wage to Increase January 1, 2018
North Carolina: NEW LAW:  North Carolina Employee Fair Classification Act
Washington: NEW LAW: Washington’s Healthy Starts Act Now In Effect


Do you have an HR question keeping you up at night?
The following questions were submitted to our HR Professionals in the past month …

Question #1
An employee got married and wants to change all her information to a new last name. Does the employee need to complete a new I9 and W4?

Question #2
We have an employee that was fired on Tuesday. He wrecked the company truck in which he was driving. He is responsible for the deductible on the damage which will be $500.
This is his last check. He will not be available to sign any paperwork stating that he will make compensation so we want to take it out of his last check. How do I go about handling this situation?
Thanks for your help. The client cannot take the $500 out of his last check without his written permission. Correct?

View the Answers

Are You Adequately Prepared For An EEOC Charge?

 

Brain Teaser

Mary Anne has been a Legal Secretary at D.C.H. Law Firm since 2010. Until recently, she has been a good performer. However, over the past year, she has missed deadlines, become sloppy with her work, and overall isn’t performing as she had in the past.

The managing partner at the firm has spoken to Mary Anne numerous times about her declining performance. Each time, Mary Anne promised that her performance would improve, but instead, her performance worsened. None of these conversations were documented and all of Mary Anne’s performance reviews reflect good performance.

Last month, Mary Anne took a week off work to attend a convention for her church. When she requested the time off, she informed the Firm of the reason for the time off.

During her absence, the managing partner discovered that Mary Anne had made a significant error that negatively impacted a client and exposed the Firm to a potential malpractice claim. This most recent error was the proverbial “straw that broke the camel’s back.”

Based on her decline in performance and the recently discovered error, Mary Anne is terminated. From the Firm’s perspective, it shouldn’t have been a surprise; they have been talking to her about the problems for quite some time.

Last week, the Firm received an EEOC charge claiming that Mary Anne had been discriminated against and terminated because of her religion. In its response to the EEOC, the Firm asserts that Mary Anne was terminated due to poor performance and cites several examples. However, no documentation was provided to support these examples. What is the EEOC’s likely response?

  1. The EEOC completely understood the situation. Once Mary Anne’s decline in performance was explained, the EEOC investigator understood why Mary Anne was terminated and dismissed the charge.
  2. The EEOC investigator responded by scheduling personal interviews with the managing partner and other members of the Firm. By “ramping up” its investigation, it appears that the EEOC sided with Mary Anne and completely discounted the Firm’s written response.
  3. The EEOC investigator asked to see documentation of Mary Anne’s performance problems and any written evidence that she was disciplined for her poor performance. When the Firm was unable to provide any documents, the investigator asked a lot of questions about Mary Anne’s absence and why she was terminated immediately following the time off. In the end, the investigator concluded Mary Anne had faced religious discrimination in the workplace and that she was terminated in retaliation for taking the time off to attend her church conference.

View the answer.

 

Avoid HR Disasters – Document, Document, Document
HR Trends

The final article of our three-part series emphasizes documentation.

“Did you document that?” This is a question that all HR Professionals receive relating to employees. Whether it’s communicating a company-wide change in policy, reporting a change in compensation,
or memorializing a performance issue, it is vital that you document these events so that the company has a clear record of an employee’s history with the company – good or bad.

Read ahead for part three of our series to Avoid HR Disasters – Document, Document, Document.


This information is provided by ePlace Solutions, Inc. which is solely responsible for its content. ePlace Solutions, Inc. is not engaged in rendering legal or other professional services. Federal and state laws are more complex than presented here. This information is simplified for the sake of brevity and is not a substitute for legal advice. ePlace Solutions, Inc. disclaims any liability, loss or risk incurred as a consequence, directly or indirectly, of the use and application of any of the contents of this information.

Testimonials

I appreciate the efficient, friendly and knowledgeable service we receive from PER. The PER team backs up their tag line “When Service Counts”! They are helpful in all aspects of HR and this allows us to concentrate on running our business.

Sherry - Controller - Restaurant and Entertainment Management Company - Orlando, Florida

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